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Recycling


Coal Mountain ES is in need of plastic water bottles for a garden art project on April 26, if you have some in your recycle bins we’ll collect them this Saturday. Please drop them off at the market before 12noon. Thank you!

Other recyclable items for farmers are glass jars, egg cartons, brown bags, and green pint containers. Drop them off any Saturday at your convenience.

Thank you for your help!
The Cumming Harvest

Newsletter - April 17, 2013


Market News

For those of you that have questions about how this all works, here’s a quick Q & A…

How do I order?
Each Wednesday morning, a list of available products is sent to all of our registered customers by e-mail. Customers must place their order for the week any time after that email goes out, but no later than Thursday at 8:00 p.m. Orders should be placed here on our website, but if you are having troubles you can respond directly to the e-mail. Ordering through this web site is Locally Grown’s preferred method as it is designed to reduce the amount of time it takes us to process orders as well as provide you with detailed information about our products.

Will I have to buy vegetables I don’t want?
Unlike some co-ops, buying clubs, or CSAs where everyone gets the same box of stuff (and you don’t know what you’re getting until you get it), with Locally Grown you get to order what you want, in the quantities that you want, from the farms that you want. The weekly email lists the produce, milled products, fresh flowers, and artisan goods available that week, and you can browse the items on this website before you place your order.

So there’s no minimum order amount?
Nope. Order as much or as little as you want, from the farms that you want.

How and when do I pay?
When you place an order, you are committing to paying for those items ordered. We take payment in several ways:

1. You can pay into your account in advance (via check or cash in person, or online via Credit/Debit card), and draw down over time. This is a very convenient method, since you only have to think about it every once in a while, but you can also:

2. Pay via credit/debit card online when you place your order. We support all Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, JCB, and Diners Club cards. Or:

3. Pay via cash, check, credit/debit card, or EBT when you pick up your order. If you pay via card, there is a 3% convenience fee to help us cover processing costs.

If you pay in person when you pick up your order, we will have already paid the growers for you on your behalf. If you fail to come pick up your items, you will still be expected to pay the amount due.

Are there membership fees?
To help us with our overhead costs, we ask that you pay an annual fee of $25 per household for one calendar year. You are welcome to try us for two orders before officially becoming members.

The membership fee will be automatically added to your third order.

Are there taxes or other charges added to my order?
The growers set their own prices, and are all-inclusive, including any taxes (like gasoline at the gas station, or food at the airport). Since the growers are selling directly to you, they (not TCH) are responsible for collecting and reporting sales and other taxes.

When and Where do I pick up my order?
From 10am until 12pm on Saturday morning, customers can pick-up their produce at 106 Colony Park Drive, in the basement of unit 100.

We do not make deliveries.

Payment is still expected for produce that is ordered but not picked up.

When I come pick up my order, you guys run around, and return with an armload of stuff. What goes on?
It’s a major effort to get all the produce together, organized, and then distributed back out to the customers. Imagine taking a full farmers’ market, spread out over a park or other location, and condensing it down to a single room — that’s what we do.

Our volunteers helped the growers unload everything, and know, more or less, where everything is. They’re running from table to table finding and gathering your items.

Oh no! I forgot to pickup my order! Now what?
Well, I’m sorry we missed you.

About a half hour before we pack up to go home, we’ll call you if you haven’t come yet, using the phone number you tied to your account. If you have a cell phone, use that number!

Most times, we get an answering machine, so if we haven’t reached you when it’s time to go, we’ll try again.

If we still haven’t been able to reach you, your items will be donated or given away! We do not have a means to keep items until the next week, or to deliver them to you. If we were able to reach you on the phone, we may be able to work out an arrangement, but otherwise, your items will be donated or given away!

Since the growers harvested just for you, and (more importantly) since we paid the growers on your behalf when they brought them to our market, you are still responsible for paying for items, even if you do not pick them up. We’ll charge your account, and that amount will get added to your next order.

Why Support Locally Grown?
Enhance your local economy: By purchasing produce and other items from local growers you are providing stability to your local economy through the support of local businesses.

Save natural resources: Buying locally makes you an invaluable link in the process of saving resources such as fossil fuels and packaging materials. Also, we are right here in your community so the expense of transportation and delivery is kept to a minimum.

Provide learning opportunities: Locally Grown supporters provide member growers the means to help educate our community about the importance of sustainable agriculture.

Supporting a way of life: The number of small farms in the United States has decreased dramatically in the last decade. Please help us preserve an honest and worthy means of making a living.

We believe that small, diverse, family-owned farms contribute to society’s overall health.

Why are some of your products labelled “organic” and others are not?
First off, no “conventional” growers are allowed to sell through our market. Everything sold here is grown without the use of synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides. Everything here could be sold as “organic”, but many growers choose not to.

To use the word “organic”, a grower must register through the USDA and keep up with a tremendous amount of paperwork. The process is very expensive and intensive, and certainly favors the larger factory farms over the small family farm.

The state of Georgia has seen that, and has given the small producer who sells only a few thousand dollars a year of produce a means to register with the state department of agriculture. A few of our growers have gone that route, and they can legally use the word “organic” in Georgia.

Another system is “Certified Naturally Grown”. This nation-wide program seeks to correct the problems with the USDA certification system. The standards are just as strict (and in some cases, more so) as the USDA Organic program, but there is no cost to become certified. There is still some paperwork, but not as much. More importantly, the growers in the program inspect each other, rather than relying on an outside for-profit certifier. Several of our growers have gone this route.

Finally, a few growers are not certified by anyone but still use organic sustainable methods on their farms.

To find out more about our growers, and to see what certification, if any, they have, take a look at our Growers page.

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - April 10, 2013


RECIPES

Slow Cooker Chicken Cacciatore
via nom nom paleo

2 onions
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tablespoons of butter
6 garlic cloves
2 teaspoons of dried oregano
1/2 ounce of dried mixed wild mushrooms, rinsed and minced (use all dried porcini mushrooms if you have it)
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1.5 pounds cremini mushrooms
1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained
1/2 cup organic chicken broth
1/2 cup dry red wine
3 pounds of boneless and skinless chicken thighs
1/4 chopped fresh basil (optional)

Saute the onions, tomato paste, butter, garlic, oregano, wild mushrooms, and red pepper flakes in a skillet until onions are clear. Add this mixture to the slow cooker and stirr in the cremini, tomatoes, broth and wine. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and add them into the slow cooker and mixed everything well. Then, I put on the lid and cooked the dish for 4-6 hours on low.
Top the dish with some basil chiffonade.

Market News

THIS WEEK
My Daily Bread has all jams $1.00 off this week. Prices are marked.

This is the last of the salmon and halibut. What I have in the freezer, listed online, is it until August.

PLANNING A GARDEN
I thought I’d share a post from Athens Locally Grown this week.

Are you planning a garden of your own? If you’ve been preparing your garden, or just thinking about starting one, be sure to check out the live plants offered by our growers through the market. Sure, you could run off to Home Depot and buy some mass-produced seedlings soaked in synthetic fertilizers, but you can also get hardy seedlings grown by the same people cultivating plants for their own vegetable beds, free of synthetic chemicals.

It’s still a little early to safely put out summer plants like tomatoes, peppers, squash, and eggplants, unless you protect them. The average last frost date for Cumming is still a week away. The weather forecast for the next week looks pretty good, but right now the low for next Saturday is projected to be 43 degrees. That’s well above freezing, but quite cold for tropical tomatoes. If you want to get a jump on things, just use row covers or other protection to keep the cold nights from stunting them.

Why am I encouraging you to grow your own food when I’m in the business of helping growers sell you food they grow? For one, studies have shown that people who grow their own gardens tend to actually increase their yearly purchases at their local farmers markets. Once they take an interest in their food so strong that they begin growing what they can, they find that they can rely even more on their local growers for things that they used to get at the grocery store. And besides, my goal is for every community to become less reliant on food grown elsewhere and shipped in from long distances. And you having your own little patch of garden in your yard is a big step in helping us do just that.

Cane Creek has had some transplants listed online and look for heirloom tomatoes coming up beginning of May from Heirloom Gardens. If you are looking for something for your garden, let me know and I’ll see if I can find it.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - April 3, 2013


RECIPES

Beef Jerky from an online site called “Against All Grain”.

Ingredients
1 pound london broil steak or flank steak
1/4 cup coconut aminos*
3/4 teaspoon all natural liquid smoke**
3/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh cracked pepper
1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
dash of cayenne pepper
*You can substitute Tamari for the coconut aminos but omit the sea salt.

*I buy All Natural Wright’s brand liquid smoke. Ingredients should just be Natural Hickory Smoke Concentrate and Water)

Directions

Place the steak in the freezer for 2 hours to firm it up and make it easier to slice thinly.
Remove it from the freezer and trim any visible white fat. Any fat left on the meat will spoil after drying.
Slice the steak into 1/8 inch pieces. For London broil slice it with the grain, for flank steak slice it against the grain.
Whisk together the ingredients for the marinade and combine the marinade with the beef slices in a shallow dish or a ziploc bag. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator overnight or up to 24 hours turning occasionally to evenly coat.
Remove the meat from the marinade and pat it dry with paper towels.

Dehydrator Method
Evenly place the strips on dehydrator sheets lined with parchment paper, careful not to let them overlap.
Dehydrate the beef for 3-4 hours at 145 degrees F, flipping once half way through.

Oven Method
Preheat oven to the lowest setting, usually 150-170 degrees F.
Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or foil and place a heavy wire rack over both (an oven safe cookie cooling rack will do).
Place the strips of beef on the racks leaving space between each piece so they’re not touching. Place the trays in the oven, leaving it open a crack to allow air to circulate.
Dehydrate for 8-10 hours, depending on the thickness of the meat, turning 1 time half way through.

*If you have a convection setting this process will probably take about half the time. Check for dryness around 5 hours and continue dehydrating if the strips are still moist.

Store the beef jerky in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week. *The research I’ve done shows that this method results in jerky that can last on the shelf in a well sealed container for as long as 2 months. It never lasts long enough in our house to test that out though!

Market News

I hope you’re enjoying your Spring Break week, especially all the beautiful weather before the rain comes tomorrow. Thank you for visiting us on Saturday at the Easter Eggstravaganza event, I got a lot of new interest for the market and met the people at Chuiced. They make a unique blend of fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds in two flavors. It’s juice you chew and although sounds odd, it’s really good!

I don’t know if you heard but Toula Argentis of 2B Whole lost her son last week to complications of the flu. We offer her and her family our condolences and hope they are able to find peace in their hearts soon. Keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - March 27, 2013


RECIPES

Maple Salmon

Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Ready In: 1 Hour
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
1/4 cup maple syrup
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pound Doug’s Alaska Salmon

Directions:
1. In a small bowl, mix the maple syrup, soy sauce, garlic, garlic salt, and pepper.
2. Place salmon in a shallow glass baking dish, and coat with the maple syrup mixture. Cover the dish, and marinate salmon in the refrigerator 30 minutes, turning once.
3. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
4. Place the baking dish in the preheated oven, and bake salmon uncovered 20 minutes, or until easily flaked with a fork.

Market News

For this Saturday ONLY, PLEASE ARRIVE FOR PICK UP BEFORE 11:30am We’ll be closing a little early to go set up for the CCC Easter Eggstravaganza and Health Fair (flyer below). Come down to the event and see Ancient Awakenings, B & B Enterprises, Farm Fresh Foods, My Daily Bread, and Simply Southard.

Did you enjoy Yonah Coffee last Saturday, what a display and great products! I’ll miss the eroma of freshly brewed coffee at the market and I was so busy working I forgot to get a coffee/hazelnut scented candle, those were the best! Look for Yonah Coffee online the week of April 15th, can’t wait.

This week we’re excited to welcome Joyful Noise Acres back to the market selling chicken. She has whole birds, half and leg quarters available, all are frozen at pick up. This is the last of the chicken from their fall harvest. We stocked the freezer for our customers, so they didn’t have to stock theirs. We will have fresh chicken again starting the end of May.

Good Shepherd Herbals is now listed online. I’ve heard from 3 people that the trauma balm is amazing. Watch for the announcement on when she’ll be our Farmer of the Day. I know she’ll have some great herbal information for us.

Green Pasture – A group order for cod liver oil and/or coconut oil has started and I will be placing the order on Saturday, March 30th. The shipping usually takes about 9 days but I’m not sure what will happen with the holiday. If you want to place an order, please email me asap.

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

EVENTS


March 30 – Christ Community Church and Natural Body Spa are hosting an Easter Eggstravaganza and Health Fair. The Cumming Harvest vendors will be participating. Should be a fun event for the entire family!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Green Pasture Coconut Oil and Cod Liver Oil Order


This is the last week to get in on the group order for Green Pasture, Cod Liver Oil and/or Coconut Oil. If you would like to see a price list and/or place your order, please email me at thecummingharvest@live.com.

Thank you,
Suzanne Geddes
Market Manager
The Cumming Harvest

BACON UPDATE


The bacon is smoked and ready but not sliced and packed. We will not be able to deliver it until next Saturday, March 30th.

Thanks,

Greg Hutchins
770-377-5380

Taking Green Pasture orders for cod liver oil and coconut oil, you can email me or sign up at the pick up tomorrow. I’ll place the order on Saturday, March 30th.

Thanks,
Suzanne Geddes
404-702-2601
thecummingharvest@live.com

Newsletter - March 20, 2013


RECIPES

Bacon-Curing

This is a recipe from one of the workshops I attended on Saturday at the North Georgia Chapter Weston A Price Conference. I’ve tried to cure a pork belly once but had to throw it out because I used way too much salt. This presenter cured bacon two ways, one with smoked salt and the other with added maple syrup. Both were really good so to make sure you don’t listen to me, go by what she says here and hopefully yours will turn out better.

If you buy a half or whole hog from a pasture-based farmer, you’re going to get anywhere from 4 to 10 pounds of pork belly. Why not do something with it? My first pork belly sat in my freezer for 6 months, because I was afraid to touch it. I was worried about bacteria during the curing process and the fact that I didn’t own a smoker.

But curing bacon doesn’t have to be complicated.

Then, there’s the recent Wise Traditions article on nitrates/nitrites. My takeaway was that we’re not sure of the actual quantities of nitrites and nitrates in the celery salt that is used for “no-nitrate bacon.” In light of that, common grocery store bacon could be a better option. But making your own bacon from a pastured animal, and curing it with sea salt is the best way to know exactly what is in your food.

How does the cure work?
The salt preserves the meat, gives it flavor, and draws out meat juices to make the meat drier and more shelf-stable. It is then stored in the refrigerator and used as needed over the course of several months. But my family usually goes through a full pound of pork belly in one breakfast. We are shameless, pastured bacon fanatics.

Basic Recipe
1 pound pork belly
1 Tbsp fine sea salt per pound of meat
Note: Using smoked sea salt will give it the “bacon-y” flavor that most of us are used to.
1 tsp pepper
1 Tbsp maple syrup

Make a paste of salt, pepper, and maple syrup. Place the belly in a freezer ziplock bag and coat it with the paste. Let it sit for five days in the refrigerator, turning over each day to make sure the cure is distributed evenly. You can let it go longer, but it will get saltier.

After 5 days, remove it from the bag and slice the cold belly (an electric knife works really well).
Lastly, slice the rind off. Keeping the rind on during slicing helps the belly stay together. If the belly starts to slide around while you’re slicing it, put it back in the fridge for a few minutes to firm it up again.

I like to bake my bacon in a Pyrex dish in the oven- 375? for 23 minutes. Some people like it on a
lower temperature- 325? for 35 minutes.

Market News

Good Morning!
This past weekend I attended a Weston Price conference and workshops at Rancho Alegre. David Wetzel told us about how he arrived at the decision to produce fermented cod liver oil the traditional way. He has a new product that blends cod liver oil, coconut oil and butter oil all in one. It’s the consistency of the gel, I tried the cinnamon and carob banana, both were easy to take at least for me. I also learned about curing bacon, making sourdough and preparing organ meats. I have some handouts I can pass on to you if you’re interested, just let me know.

Do you have a kindle? About once a week someone tells me about a free kindle e-book about health, recipes and food. If you would like to know about these deals, watch The Cumming Harvest on Facebook, they are usually only good for the day.

WELCOME
Yonah Mountain Coffee will be our Farmer of the Day this Saturday. Come ready for a sample of freshly brewed coffee. If you missed their story last week, check it out here.

Welcome Good Shepherd Herbals to the market! Look for their products soon. Father’s Bounty Homestead is the home of Good Shepherd Herbals. Herbal salves, goat’s milk soaps and medicinal tea blends are made with care on their family farm. They also offer a line of livestock herbals for worming and dietary supplementation which can be viewed when you visit their website at www.goodshepherdherbals.com.

GREEN PASTURE
I will place another order for Cod Liver Oil and Coconut oil on March 31. Send me an email, thecummingharvest@live.com, or sign up at Saturday pick up.

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

EVENTS


March 24 – Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center is hosting a Grow Your Own Food Event.

March 30 – Christ Community Church and Natural Body Spa are hosting an Easter Eggstravaganza and Health Fair. The Cumming Harvest vendors will be participating. Should be a fun event for the entire family!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

March 13, 2013


RECIPES

ASSERTIVE GREENS WITH ONIONS OR SHALLOTS AND CREAM

A bit of background — all leafy greens are not interchangeable. Some are delicate enough for salads; others can be tough as shoe leather. In general, though, they fall into two categories, each of which is handled differently. Within each category, though, the type of green used is pretty much interchangeable. The “tender greens” (beet greens, Swiss chard, spinach) are delicate and moisture-rich. The “assertive greens” (kale, mustard, turnips, collards) are stronger in flavor, and require added liquid as they cook.

This is a great recipe for those more assertive greens. Technique is the key. The initial shallow blanching erases some of their bitterness without robbing them of their character. It preserves their color and flavor, saves time, and allows them to be cooked more quickly.Once the greens have been blanched and drained, they can be used in any number of tasty recipes. In this one, the sweetness of the onions and the richness of the cream mellow the bitterness of the greens.

Source: Perfect Vegetables: A Best Recipe Classic, 2003, by the editors of Cook’s Illustrated magazine
Serves: serves 4 (about 2 cups of cooked greens)
Vegetarian!

Ingredients

2 pounds kale, collards, mustard or turnip greens, washed and coarsely chopped
1 1/2 tsp. salt
2 T. unsalted butter
2 medium walking onions (white portion only) or shallots, chopped fine
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. minced fresh thyme leaves
1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste

Step by Step Instructions

1. The essential blanching step: Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil in a deep pot, add the salt and greens, and stir until wilted. Cover and cook until the greens are just tender (about 7 minutes). Drain in a colander. Rinse the pot with cold water, refill it with cold water, and pour in the greens to stop the cooking. Gather a handful of greens, lift out of the water, and squeeze dry. Repeat with the rest. Roughly cut each bunch of greens, and proceed with the rest of the recipe.
2. Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat. When the foaming subsides, add the onions or shallots and cook, stirring frequently, for 3 to 4 minutes. Then add the squeezed, cut greens and stir to coat them with the butter.
3. Stir in the cream, sugar, thyme, and nutmeg. Cover and cook until the greens are heated through (about 2 minutes). If any excess liquid remains, remove the lid and continue to simmer until the cream has thickened slightly (about 1 minute longer).
4. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve immediately.

Market News

Good Morning!
Coming Soon…Yonah Mountain Coffee.
March 23rd Yonah Mountain Coffee will be visiting the market to show their products and brew a fresh batch of coffee just for you! Yonah Mountain Coffee has an interesting story that you can read about on their website HERE.

GREEN PASTURE
I will place another order for Cod Liver Oil and Coconut oil on April 1st. Send me an email, thecummingharvest@live.com, or sign up at Saturday pick up.

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

EVENTS


March 16 – Weston Price Conference at Rancho Alegre Farm. Info and Register Here

March 24 – Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center is hosting a Grow Your Own Food Event.

March 30 – Christ Community Church and Natural Body Spa are hosting an Easter Eggstravaganza and Health Fair. The Cumming Harvest vendors will be participating. Should be a fun event for the entire family!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - March 6, 2013


RECIPES

Spicy Kale Soup
Delicious on a rainy winter day!

Source: Adapted from Vegan Fire and Spice (Entered by Wendy Sundgren)
Serves: Serves 4
Vegan!

Ingredients
2 tsp. olive oil
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, finely minced
2 Yukon Gold potatoes, diced
5 cups vegetable broth
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. hot red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 bay leaf
5 cups chopped fresh kale
2 cups cooked white beans
Splash of sherry

Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and carrot. Cover, and cook until softened, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic, potatoes, broth, salt, oregano, red pepper flakes, and bay leaf. Simmer for 20 minutes. Stir in the kale and cook until tender, about 15 to 20 minutes longer. Add the beans and a healthy splash of sherry and simmer just until heated through. Taste to adjust seasonings. Remove the bay leaf before serving.

Market News

Good Morning!

We have a new vendor this week. Welcome From Mimi’s Mountain Home to The Cumming Harvest.
Here is their description…"Everything we sell as homemade is truly homemade, right here on the north side of Atlanta! Our products are NOT purchased from a factory and repackaged to be “homemade”. All of our recipes are passed down from my grandmother, “Mimi” (and her mother too!). Some are quick to make, and some take days to make, but Mimi always said that patience makes perfect!

All of our products are 100% Natural, No man made Colors or Scents! We use natural coloring and essential oils!

If you have any questions/comments/concerns or just want to talk, let us know at imtellingmimi@fmmhome.com

I’ve also added a Amestoy Farm as a new grower. He’s just starting out but once he’s ready he’ll be growing many different varieties of vegetables, some herbs, berries, fruits and also have a limited amount of pastured eggs. Some of the techniques he practices are cover cropping, crop rotation, composting. I grow without using any synthetic herbicides or pesticides. Amestoy Farm is also Certified Naturally Grown.

Is there any items you’d like to see added to the market? Or if you know of another vendor at another market that you would like to see sell at The Cumming Harvest, I can see if they’d make a good fit with our market. Let me know.

GREEN PASTURE
The Cod Liver Oil and Coconut oil is in and I will have it at the market on Saturday. If you placed an order, please come by the market to pick up your order this Saturday. Send me an email if you have questions, thecummingharvest@live.com.

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

EVENTS


March 16 – Weston Price Conference at Rancho Alegre Farm. Info and Register Here

March 24 – Gwinnett Environmental and Heritage Center is hosting a Grow Your Own Food Event.

March 30 – Christ Community Church and Natural Body Spa are hosting an Easter Eggstravaganza and Health Fair. The Cumming Harvest vendors will be participating. Should be a fun event for the entire family!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!