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Newsletter - May 15, 2013


Market News

Yonah Coffee is now listed online. Remember that awesome display they had at Farmer of the Day? Now you can purchase their products online.

Halibut I just got a box of halibut, the last box for the season and listed it online.

LAST WEEK TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR Cod Liver Oil and Coconut Oil from Green Pasture. You can look them up at www.greenpasture.org. Send me an email or sign up on Saturday at the market.

Question: I’m disappointed in an item I ordered, what should I do?
Answer: Email the vendor. I’m proud to work for all these vendors, they are all so passionate about their products and quality is important to them. They’ll always make it right for you. If you email me, I will immediately forward the message to the vendor. Sometimes packing is rushed or things are overlooked but it’s never their intention to provide you with anything other than the best quality. You just have to let us know.

March Against Monsanto
If you buy organic, you probably know about Monsanto. On May 25th, all over the world, there will be groups marching to stand up to the company and demand they make some major changes. Here are some links with more information, http://www.march-against-monsanto.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/events/611109998903226/

Cooking Class at Cane Creek Farm
This is quick notice, but Cane Creek Farm is offering a cooking class today from 11-1pm. You will learn how to cook greens you see listed online. Cost is $25 for CCF CSA members and $35 for non-members. Register by sending an email to Cane Creek.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - May 8, 2013


Market News

I’ll be starting another group order this week for Cod Liver Oil and Coconut Oil from Green Pasture. You can look them up at www.greenpasture.org
Send me an email or sign up on Saturday at the market.

WORM CASTINGS and WHAT ARE THEY?
Castings (worm poop) are rich in plant nutrients, trace minerals and growth enhancers, and incorporating castings into the soil significantly increases microbial life in the root zone. Red wiggler worm castings have a N-P-K ratio of about 3.2-1.1-1.5. Nutrients are readily available, yet the castings are incapable of burning plants. The odorless castings have a consistency similar to peat. Work them into new plantings as you would compost to improve soil structure, and to increase moisture and nutrient-holding capacity. In existing perennial borders, vegetable gardens and around fruiting trees and shrubs, apply castings 1 inch deep in spring and work into the soil 3 inches deep. The castings will provide all the fertilizer most of your plants will need for the season. To help bring dried-out lawns out of dormancy, top-dress as soon as possible with a 1/4-inch layer of castings. The fall rains will wash the minerals and nutrients into the root zone, and the microorganisms will help bring depleted soils back to life.

Herron Farms sells a 2 lb bag of castings which he recommends making compost tea. Once you add water and a little food (honey or molasses)to the castings, stir and let steep, you’ll have enough for an acre or more.

Read here for more info on worm castings and tea

SPECIAL REQUEST
One of our customers would like to know if there is anyone available to pick up their order and deliver, 1 to 2x per month, for the next month or two while their car is being repaired. They live at the end of Pilgrim Mill (near Tidwell Park). Please email jasmine@jasmineweiner.com if you can help.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - May 1, 2013


RECIPES

RAW Carrot Cake Balls (Dipped in RAW chocolate)
Grain Free/Gluten Free/Dairy Free/Vegan/RAW

Ingredients:
Note: This recipe does not contain exact measurements as veggies and fruits come in all sizes. Use the measurements below as a guide. You just want a ball that holds together. Feel free to experiment with different flavors! I rarely measure this recipe out and that’s half the fun!

Makes approx. 10-12 cake balls depending on your ingredients and size of the cake ball

1 Large carrot, peeled
1 large tart apple, cored

1/8 cup or a handful of currants (or chopped raisins)
1/2 cup dried shredded coconut (use more or less as needed to thicken the mix)
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp or a pinch of nutmeg, more if you like it!

*1-2 Tbls RAW honey (maple syrup or palm nectar)
*2 Tbls RAW nut butter (almond, pecan, walnut, cashew)

Optional: Raw cacao nibs for decoration

*Note: Depending on your pulp, you may need to use more or less honey/nut butter or more coconut to get the desired texture. Remember go by feel.

Dipping chocolate

1/4 cup coconut oil
2 Tbls raw honey
1/2 tsp vanilla
7 Tbls of raw cacao (add another half Tbls for making a drizzle)

OR

1 cup Enjoy Life Chocolate chips melted plus 1/2 teaspoon ghee or palm shortening melted in to help it set faster and keep the chocolate from getting super hard in the freezer.

Directions:
Grate the carrots and the apple, by hand or w/a food processor. Then press out as much juice as possible by using a fine sieve, strainer. Alternately, you can use a nut milk bag or cheese cloth to squeeze out the juice. Originally, I used my juicer for this recipe and they turned out pretty great. However, I have found that there is MUCH more flavor to the cake ball when I make the pulp by hand.

Add the rest of the ingredients, except the cacao nibs or toppings to the carrot/apple pulp. Mix well.

Roll the dough into balls (about 1 Tbls worth of dough)

Chill the cake balls in the freezer for about 30 min.

While the cake balls are chilling prepare the chocolate…

Start with room temperature unrefined coconut oil (it’s liquid point is around 76 degrees). In a small bowl, combine the liquefied coconut oil, vanilla, honey and cocoa. Whisk together until the chocolate is well combined, with no lumps. I like to let the chocolate rest for about 15 min or so to let the cacao absorb well into the oil.

Using a wood skewer or dipping fork, dip the frozen cake balls into the chocolate. Let some of the chocolate drip off than allow the chocolate to harden while you hold the stick (it will harden pretty fast), sprinkle a few cocoa nibs or nuts on the top of the cake ball before the top hardens. If you don’t take the time to let some of the chocolate drip off you may not have enough chocolate to finish all the cake balls. They still taste great with a thick coating, but you will have to make extra chocolate sauce. It takes some practice to make your chocolate go far. If practice isn’t your thing just make extra chocolate sauce.

Tip: it’s common for the chocolate to crack slightly as it hardens. This can be reduced if you leave some space at the bottom of the cake ball without chocolate. That is often where the crack starts. However, if a crack does happen, it is VERY easy to cover it up when you drizzle the chocolate over it later. So don’t stress out about that. Can’t have chocolate? Don’t worry. Just roll the cakes balls in shredded dried coconut or crushed nuts before chilling them.

Decorating:
For the chocolate drizzle, make the same chocolate recipe as above, but add 1/2-1 Tbls more of raw cacao. This will make it a bit thicker. Using a spoon or a ‘candy making’ squeeze bottle (get it at any craft store) drizzle the chocolate in thin lines over the cake ball.

Cake balls should be kept chilled in the freezer for best results. Take them out about 5 min before serving. They should be fine for about 15 min before starting to soften too much. At that point, the coconut oil will become liquid (at around 76 degrees) and the chocolate will begin to melt.

I have also kept these in the fridge, producing a much softer cake ball. They taste great this way, the only downside is they DO melt in your hand as well as in your mouth.

Market News

THIS WEEK
Come by to visit with Dena of Good Shepherd Herbals, she’ll be at the market as our Farmer of the Day! If you’re curious about how herbs and essential oils are healing, this will be the day to visit.

Storage Containers: Last week I sent a request for recyclables, I need to clarify that we’re looking for containers from items you’ve purchased from the Cumming Harvest vendors. Egg Cartons, Glass jars from B&B Honey and Ancient Awakenings, paper bags from My Daily Bread and Ancient Awakenings and the small green berry containers from Cane Creek, Weedy Soil and Hog Mountain and the clear plastic containers from the bakers. I appreciate everyone that brought in items last week even if they weren’t exactly what we were looking for. Recycling is always a good thing!

GREENS: We’re starting to see more greens listed online; lettuce, chard, spinach, arugula, etc. You should always expect to wash your greens before using them. The farmers do a “field wash”, which is quickly swishing them in clean water once or twice to get off most of the dirt, but it is suggested to wash again. Just separate the leaves in a collendar and spray with water in the kitchen sink or fill a bowl with water to swish individual leaves to get the final dirt off. You don’t HAVE to wash, because there isn’t any chemicals, but there may still be a little dirt left after the field wash.

FISH: We’re coming to the end of the Alaskan Salmon, we ran out of Halibut last week. Doug will be moving back to Alaska in the next few weeks and fishing until August when he’ll come back with the fresh catch!

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Farmer of the Day and Plants for sale


We have exciting news…Phoenix Gardens will be joining us on Saturday as our Farmer of the Day! Come over and visit with Gwendolyn even if you didn’t place a order. She will probably have some good extra items you can buy.

Also, I have some plants left after the Coal Mountain ES plant sale I had today. I will have them at the market tomorrow if anyone is interested in purchasing. These are organically grown by Heirloom Gardens. We have a handful of tomato plants, herbs, hostas, echinacea, ferns and acorus.

Looking forward to seeing you tomorrow between 10-12pm.

Thank you,
Suzanne Geddes
thecummingharvest@live.com
404-702-2601

website


The website is working, it was a glitch on my end! Oooops

Website PROBLEM


I’m sorry about the inconvenience, the website is on but apparently the option to place items in the cart is unavailable, I have a call into the web developer to resolve the problem.

Thank you for your patience.
Suzanne

Newsletter - April 24, 2013


RECIPES

Southwestern Omelet Muffins

1. You can make a whole bunch on the weekend, save some, and store the rest in the freezer and pop out as needed.
2. They’re loaded with veggies, healthy fat and protein, which is just what your body wants to fuel with first thing in the morning to normalize your blood sugar. This means your energy, mood, and hormones will be stable through the day, and the chances you’ll binge on afternoon sweet, treats, and coffee drops.
3. They are freaking delicious. You can use whatever meat and veggies you have. I even chop up random leftovers and throw them into a muffin tin with eggs sometimes!
4. They are portable which makes them great for lunch boxes and road trips.

Ingredients:
6 ounces breakfast sausage
2 bell peppers, assorted colors, chopped small
1/2 cup green onions, chopped small
3/4 cups kale, chopped small
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon cumin
1 tablespoon garlic powder (or 2 cloves chopped fresh garlic)
4 ounce can green chiles, chopped
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
1 dozen eggs

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Heat large skillet on medium high heat. Add sausage and browned. Add peppers and kale and cook to soften, about 5 minutes. In a large bowl, beat eggs with remaining ingredients. Add sausage and veggies. Line muffin tins with papers and divide egg mixture among them, filling about 3/4 full. Bake for about 25 minutes, or until the center is firm to the touch.

Market News

THIS WEEK
Enjoy some new products from Mimi’s Mountain Home and Good Shepherd Herbals, they also make great Mother’s Day gifts.

Yonah Coffee will be listing soon, watch for them in the next few weeks.

Storage Containers: Last week I sent a request for recyclables, I need to clarify that we’re looking for containers from items you’ve purchased from the Cumming Harvest vendors. Egg Cartons, Glass jars from B&B Honey and Ancient Awakenings, paper bags from My Daily Bread and Ancient Awakenings and the small green berry containers from Cane Creek, Weedy Soil and Hog Mountain and the clear plastic containers from the bakers. I appreciate everyone that brought in items last week even if they weren’t exactly what we were looking for. Recycling is always a good thing!

GREENS: We’re starting to see more greens listed online; lettuce, spinach, arugula, etc. You should always expect to wash your greens before using them. The farmers do a “field wash”, which is quickly swishing them in clean water once or twice to get off most of the dirt, but it is suggested to wash again. Just separate the leaves in a collendar and spray with water in the kitchen sink or fill a bowl with water to swish individual leaves to get the final dirt off. You don’t HAVE to wash, because there isn’t any chemicals, but there may still be a little dirt left after a field wash.

FISH: We’re coming to the end of the Alaskan Salmon, we ran out of Halibut last week. Doug will be moving back to Alaska in the next few weeks and fishing until August when he’ll come back with the fresh catch!

Chicken: We’re out of chicken at the moment, the next availability will be sometime in May.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Recycling


Coal Mountain ES is in need of plastic water bottles for a garden art project on April 26, if you have some in your recycle bins we’ll collect them this Saturday. Please drop them off at the market before 12noon. Thank you!

Other recyclable items for farmers are glass jars, egg cartons, brown bags, and green pint containers. Drop them off any Saturday at your convenience.

Thank you for your help!
The Cumming Harvest

Newsletter - April 17, 2013


Market News

For those of you that have questions about how this all works, here’s a quick Q & A…

How do I order?
Each Wednesday morning, a list of available products is sent to all of our registered customers by e-mail. Customers must place their order for the week any time after that email goes out, but no later than Thursday at 8:00 p.m. Orders should be placed here on our website, but if you are having troubles you can respond directly to the e-mail. Ordering through this web site is Locally Grown’s preferred method as it is designed to reduce the amount of time it takes us to process orders as well as provide you with detailed information about our products.

Will I have to buy vegetables I don’t want?
Unlike some co-ops, buying clubs, or CSAs where everyone gets the same box of stuff (and you don’t know what you’re getting until you get it), with Locally Grown you get to order what you want, in the quantities that you want, from the farms that you want. The weekly email lists the produce, milled products, fresh flowers, and artisan goods available that week, and you can browse the items on this website before you place your order.

So there’s no minimum order amount?
Nope. Order as much or as little as you want, from the farms that you want.

How and when do I pay?
When you place an order, you are committing to paying for those items ordered. We take payment in several ways:

1. You can pay into your account in advance (via check or cash in person, or online via Credit/Debit card), and draw down over time. This is a very convenient method, since you only have to think about it every once in a while, but you can also:

2. Pay via credit/debit card online when you place your order. We support all Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, JCB, and Diners Club cards. Or:

3. Pay via cash, check, credit/debit card, or EBT when you pick up your order. If you pay via card, there is a 3% convenience fee to help us cover processing costs.

If you pay in person when you pick up your order, we will have already paid the growers for you on your behalf. If you fail to come pick up your items, you will still be expected to pay the amount due.

Are there membership fees?
To help us with our overhead costs, we ask that you pay an annual fee of $25 per household for one calendar year. You are welcome to try us for two orders before officially becoming members.

The membership fee will be automatically added to your third order.

Are there taxes or other charges added to my order?
The growers set their own prices, and are all-inclusive, including any taxes (like gasoline at the gas station, or food at the airport). Since the growers are selling directly to you, they (not TCH) are responsible for collecting and reporting sales and other taxes.

When and Where do I pick up my order?
From 10am until 12pm on Saturday morning, customers can pick-up their produce at 106 Colony Park Drive, in the basement of unit 100.

We do not make deliveries.

Payment is still expected for produce that is ordered but not picked up.

When I come pick up my order, you guys run around, and return with an armload of stuff. What goes on?
It’s a major effort to get all the produce together, organized, and then distributed back out to the customers. Imagine taking a full farmers’ market, spread out over a park or other location, and condensing it down to a single room — that’s what we do.

Our volunteers helped the growers unload everything, and know, more or less, where everything is. They’re running from table to table finding and gathering your items.

Oh no! I forgot to pickup my order! Now what?
Well, I’m sorry we missed you.

About a half hour before we pack up to go home, we’ll call you if you haven’t come yet, using the phone number you tied to your account. If you have a cell phone, use that number!

Most times, we get an answering machine, so if we haven’t reached you when it’s time to go, we’ll try again.

If we still haven’t been able to reach you, your items will be donated or given away! We do not have a means to keep items until the next week, or to deliver them to you. If we were able to reach you on the phone, we may be able to work out an arrangement, but otherwise, your items will be donated or given away!

Since the growers harvested just for you, and (more importantly) since we paid the growers on your behalf when they brought them to our market, you are still responsible for paying for items, even if you do not pick them up. We’ll charge your account, and that amount will get added to your next order.

Why Support Locally Grown?
Enhance your local economy: By purchasing produce and other items from local growers you are providing stability to your local economy through the support of local businesses.

Save natural resources: Buying locally makes you an invaluable link in the process of saving resources such as fossil fuels and packaging materials. Also, we are right here in your community so the expense of transportation and delivery is kept to a minimum.

Provide learning opportunities: Locally Grown supporters provide member growers the means to help educate our community about the importance of sustainable agriculture.

Supporting a way of life: The number of small farms in the United States has decreased dramatically in the last decade. Please help us preserve an honest and worthy means of making a living.

We believe that small, diverse, family-owned farms contribute to society’s overall health.

Why are some of your products labelled “organic” and others are not?
First off, no “conventional” growers are allowed to sell through our market. Everything sold here is grown without the use of synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides. Everything here could be sold as “organic”, but many growers choose not to.

To use the word “organic”, a grower must register through the USDA and keep up with a tremendous amount of paperwork. The process is very expensive and intensive, and certainly favors the larger factory farms over the small family farm.

The state of Georgia has seen that, and has given the small producer who sells only a few thousand dollars a year of produce a means to register with the state department of agriculture. A few of our growers have gone that route, and they can legally use the word “organic” in Georgia.

Another system is “Certified Naturally Grown”. This nation-wide program seeks to correct the problems with the USDA certification system. The standards are just as strict (and in some cases, more so) as the USDA Organic program, but there is no cost to become certified. There is still some paperwork, but not as much. More importantly, the growers in the program inspect each other, rather than relying on an outside for-profit certifier. Several of our growers have gone this route.

Finally, a few growers are not certified by anyone but still use organic sustainable methods on their farms.

To find out more about our growers, and to see what certification, if any, they have, take a look at our Growers page.

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Newsletter - April 10, 2013


RECIPES

Slow Cooker Chicken Cacciatore
via nom nom paleo

2 onions
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tablespoons of butter
6 garlic cloves
2 teaspoons of dried oregano
1/2 ounce of dried mixed wild mushrooms, rinsed and minced (use all dried porcini mushrooms if you have it)
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1.5 pounds cremini mushrooms
1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained
1/2 cup organic chicken broth
1/2 cup dry red wine
3 pounds of boneless and skinless chicken thighs
1/4 chopped fresh basil (optional)

Saute the onions, tomato paste, butter, garlic, oregano, wild mushrooms, and red pepper flakes in a skillet until onions are clear. Add this mixture to the slow cooker and stirr in the cremini, tomatoes, broth and wine. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and add them into the slow cooker and mixed everything well. Then, I put on the lid and cooked the dish for 4-6 hours on low.
Top the dish with some basil chiffonade.

Market News

THIS WEEK
My Daily Bread has all jams $1.00 off this week. Prices are marked.

This is the last of the salmon and halibut. What I have in the freezer, listed online, is it until August.

PLANNING A GARDEN
I thought I’d share a post from Athens Locally Grown this week.

Are you planning a garden of your own? If you’ve been preparing your garden, or just thinking about starting one, be sure to check out the live plants offered by our growers through the market. Sure, you could run off to Home Depot and buy some mass-produced seedlings soaked in synthetic fertilizers, but you can also get hardy seedlings grown by the same people cultivating plants for their own vegetable beds, free of synthetic chemicals.

It’s still a little early to safely put out summer plants like tomatoes, peppers, squash, and eggplants, unless you protect them. The average last frost date for Cumming is still a week away. The weather forecast for the next week looks pretty good, but right now the low for next Saturday is projected to be 43 degrees. That’s well above freezing, but quite cold for tropical tomatoes. If you want to get a jump on things, just use row covers or other protection to keep the cold nights from stunting them.

Why am I encouraging you to grow your own food when I’m in the business of helping growers sell you food they grow? For one, studies have shown that people who grow their own gardens tend to actually increase their yearly purchases at their local farmers markets. Once they take an interest in their food so strong that they begin growing what they can, they find that they can rely even more on their local growers for things that they used to get at the grocery store. And besides, my goal is for every community to become less reliant on food grown elsewhere and shipped in from long distances. And you having your own little patch of garden in your yard is a big step in helping us do just that.

Cane Creek has had some transplants listed online and look for heirloom tomatoes coming up beginning of May from Heirloom Gardens. If you are looking for something for your garden, let me know and I’ll see if I can find it.

Questions?: Please feel free to contact the farmers directly, they are available to answer your questions and concerns. If you have questions about the market, I am always available. If you don’t know who to ask, email us both. :)

LOCATION & PICK-UP
Building 106, Colony Park Dr. in the Basement of Suite 100, Cumming, GA 30040. Pick up every Saturday between 10-12pm.
Google Map

To view the harvest today and tomorrow till 8pm, visit “The Market” page on our website, The Cumming Harvest

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!